Mark Foundos

Everett Harris & Co.

3790 Via de la Valle, Suite 101E

Del Mar, CA 92014

mfoundos@everettharris.com

Market Update
(all values as of 10.30.2020)

Stock Indices:

Dow Jones 26,501
S&P 500 3,269
Nasdaq 10,911

Bond Sector Yields:

2 Yr Treasury 0.14%
10 Yr Treasury 0.88%
10 Yr Municipal 0.94%
High Yield 5.72%

YTD Market Returns:

Dow Jones -7.14%
S&P 500 1.21%
Nasdaq 21.61%
MSCI-EAFE -12.61%
MSCI-Europe -15.66%
MSCI-Pacific -7.42%
MSCI-Emg Mkt -1.00%
 
US Agg Bond 6.32%
US Corp Bond 6.45%
US Gov’t Bond 7.40%

Commodity Prices:

Gold 1,878
Silver 23.72
Oil (WTI) 35.71

Currencies:

Dollar / Euro 1.17
Dollar / Pound 1.29
Yen / Dollar 104.44
Dollar / Canadian 0.75
 

Macro Overview – July 2017

International markets reacted in June as central banks throughout Europe and Asia signaled that monetary stimulus efforts were slowly being dispatched. The news propped up European currencies including the euro, pound, and Swiss franc as anticipated higher rates tend to bode well for currencies.

Central banks from around the world are slowly curtailing stimulus efforts and starting the process of normalizing global interest rates in a gradual fashion. The central banks of Canada, England, and Japan all indicated that less accommodation would be the objective going forward.

The combination of rising asset prices along with central bank tightening can be very unpredictable. Many suggest that ultra low and negative interest rates have elevated asset prices such as stocks, bonds, real estate, art and classic automobiles to unsustainable levels. As rates gradually begin to rise, it is expected to produce a gradual return to normalized asset prices worldwide.

The Fed raised its key short-term rate (Fed Funds Rate) to 1.25% in June, up from 1.0%, executing its second increase this year. The Fed also mentioned that it was still on course to start unwinding its $4.5 trillion balance sheet towards the end of the year, composed of U.S. Treasuries and mortgages.

The Fed is viewed at odds with inflation expectations as it executes on gradual rate hikes with the anticipation of rising inflation. The concern is that inflation estimates by analysts as well as the Department of Commerce are muted, with expectations of minimal inflation. The longer inflation stays low, the less consumers expect rising inflation. The concern among market watchers is that the Fed continues on a rate rise venture, but with inflation proving to be less than expected. This may lead markets to react adversely as rates increase during a dismal growth environment.

The Federal Reserve released favorable results for a stress test on banks, helping propel banking and financial related stocks. The stress tests were initially created during the financial crisis of 2008/2009 in order to minimize risk to banks’ exposure to bad loans and a dire economy. For the first time ever, all banks tested passed the stress tests successfully, building confidence in the sector and future earnings prospects.

It was ten years ago this June that the beginnings of the financial crisis of 2008/2009 started, when two hedge funds managed by the defunct Bear Sterns speculated in credit derivatives and backed by sub-prime mortgage loans, and then collapsed.

Sources: Fed, IMF, BLS, Dept. of Commerce

 

Equity Overview – Global Equity Overview

The equity markets started to experience what stock analysts call a sector rotation, when one or several sectors fall out of favor leading to funds flowing to other sectors. This past month technology stocks fell as markets perceived that the sector may have become overvalued. As this occurred, banking and financial sector stocks rose, as favorable regulatory related news lifted the overall sector.

The S&P 500 index posted its strongest first half of the year since 2013. The Dow Jones industrial average index rose 8% in the first half of 2017, its best performance since 2013, while the S&P 500 was up 8.2% the first half of 2017. The NASDAQ’s strong performance for the first six months of 2017 was predominantly led by the technology sector, its best first half since 2009.

Global equity markets had the best first annual half since 2009. Overall improving sentiment in the euro zone as well as increasing international growth prospects helped propel global markets the first half of 2017.

Sources: S&P, Reuters, Bloomberg, Dow Jones, Nasdaq

Chinese Stocks Get Inducted – International Update

The European Central Bank (ECB) hinted that it might start curtailing its stimulus program as accelerating growth takes hold throughout Europe. The news drove European bond prices lower and yields higher, simultaneously lifting the euro.

China was inducted into the MSCI Emerging Markets Index, a long awaited move by Chinese companies and international investors. MSCI, a U.S. company providing key indices as benchmarks for the global markets, opted to initially include 222 Chinese companies to the index, representing 0.73% of the MSCI Emerging Markets Index. The inclusion will give large institutional investors exposure to Chinese stocks while also elevating China’s status on the global equity markets. The MSCI did refuse to add Chinese stocks to its index compilation on three prior attempts.

The results of elections in France dismissed concerns of an immediate French exit from the Euro, thus alleviating tensions in the currency markets. Concurrently, escalating tensions between foreign leaders and the U.S. have shifted some assets to less susceptible positions.

Sources: Eurostat, ECB, MSCI, Reuters